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Vagabond of the year

Posted by trikebum on December 30, 2008 at 5:24 PM Comments comments (0)


I nominate fellow trike tourer Tony Adams for vagabond of the year. He's been triking around the states for 8 years now. He says he only averages 3 mph and it's no wonder.....total weight he's hauling is 620 lbs.! My total touring weight is about 350 in cluding myself.....and I get an average 9.5 mph.... which is pretty slow compared to most 2-wheeled tourers
Anyway, the more power to him..I wish I had a big chunk of time so I could do the same. Oh well, for now I'll have to be happy with 1 or 2  10 day tours a year. Go Tony go!

Electric assist trike

Posted by trikebum on December 22, 2008 at 8:50 PM Comments comments (0)


This is a 2003 Lightfoot Cycles Courier, my personal transportation. This fall I installed a Heinzman Electric hub motor kit. It's a Mountain drive 500W motor w/36v NiCad battery pak.
The beauty of the NiCad battery pak is it only takes 2 hrs tops to charge it.
This is a heavy bike to begin with. I would guess with tools, cargo box, fenders and fairing, It probably weighs about 80#. My average speed doing errands in town is about 8.5 mph.
With the electric assist my average increases to 10.5mph or there-a-bouts. On the level I can maintain speeds up tp 25 kph which makes it very effective for traffic cycling. But it's a lot easier on me, and I don't think that is a good thing.
. I find that used judiciously, the motor has a range of about 20 miles, and when it runs out of juice, it's a lot harder to pedal than without. Consider that the weight of motor and battery is another 11 kg/22 lbs and the electric motor hub IMO does not freewheel as well as a regular bike wheel.  So suffice it to say, it's only good for in town, but in town it's damn good.

Electric assist trike

Posted by trikebum on December 22, 2008 at 8:40 PM Comments comments (0)


This is a 2003 Lightfoot Cycles Courier, my personal transportation. This fall I installed a Heinzman Electric hub motor kit. It's a Mountain drive 500W motor w/36v NiCad battery pak.
The beauty of the NiCad battery pak is it only takes 2 hrs tops to charge it.
This is a heavy bike to begin with. I would guess with tools, cargo box, fenders and fairing, It probably weighs about 80#. My average speed doing errands in town is about 8.5 mph.
With the electric assist my average increases to 10.5mph or there-a-bouts. On the level I can maintain speeds of15 mph easily which makes it very effective for traffic cycling. But it's a lot easier on me, and I don't think that is a good thing. This way I will not get in shape for out-of town touring which is my pleasure.
When touring I usually carry 65# of camping gear plus added water at 2# per litre. My average speed then is about 9.5 mph depending on terrain. The motor is ok used judiciously for about 20 miles, and when it runs out of juice, it's a lot harder to pedal than without. Consider that the weight of motor and battery is another 11 lbs and the electric motor hub does not freewheel as well as a regular bike wheel. There is a lot of resistance. So suffice it to say, it's only good for in town, but in town it's damn good.

Peterborough's worst intersection: a letter to the Peterborough Examiner

Posted by trikebum on December 3, 2008 at 8:22 PM Comments comments (0)

Thursday, November 13, 2008 9:20 PM

It  seems the police and city staff have known for quite a long time that Lansdowne  and Monaghan is the most dangerous intersection in Peterborough. I?m sure  city council had that information too.
 

Knowing  then what the Examiner has now revealed to the public, why would city staff and  city council agree to create a bike lane that directs new cyclists into this  unsafe intersection? And if they had the opportunity, would they change their  minds on this?
 

In a  presentation to city council last November I questioned city staff?s proposal to  create a bike lane on busy Monaghan  Rd., a high traffic, heavy truck route that cyclists  would normally avoid. They were unable to show that bike lanes were any safer  than riding on roads obeying traffic rules. But claimed one American study  showed bike lanes attract new cyclists and that alone is good enough reason, as  they have a mandate to encourage alternative  transportation.
 

Competent  cyclists who practice and obey the rules of the road are not attracted to bike  lanes. But to the young, the inexperienced and the timid are. Bike lanes give a  perception of safety as they are designed and recommended by the city. Many  parents tell their children to use the bike lane, but what happens when it ends?  They are directed into busy intersections such as the above without the  experience or knowledge to cycle safely with traffic. There are three schools on  Monaghan  Rd., and Fleming College students have been directed to use  this bike lane to access Crawford  Dr. But there is no need for any of these students to  use this intersection. There are safer alternate  routes.
 

City  police say there were 34 collisions at this junction last year. How many  cyclists will be hit this year? Recently a young father was seriously injured  while riding through this intersection, and I can?t help wondering if he was  attracted to it because of the bike lane.
 

Transportation  manager Jim Kimble says, ?The intersection is a perfect example of engineering  as much safety as possible.? And, "From an engineering perspective there's not a  lot the city could do to make it safer.? I disagree. I would suggest that  through engineering, the city is making this intersection less safe, by  knowingly directing novice cyclists into an already dicey  situation.

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